Council Pencil Sale Defies Bake-Sale Law

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The Junior Student Council organized pencil sales during February in which they sold pencils for $1 and gave away free baked goods.

Some people saw the pencil sale as a way to get around a state law that prohibits bake sales. Junior Class President Parker Smith doesn’t see it that way. “It’s not meant to get around anything. It’s just meant to be a creative way to raise money,” Smith said.

Smith also said he thinks it is not unfair to other groups and clubs that want to sell baked goods as well. “We looked at a creative solution to a clear problem and we went through the necessary channels. We wrote a proposal and got it approved. No other club has done this,” Smith said.

The idea for the pencil sale was taken to junior class adviser Walter Slovikovski, who told them to take the idea to administrators, who approved it. Slovikovski said that the pencil sale did not technically go against the letter of the law.

“It was unique to me and it wasn’t a bake sale,” Slovikovski said. But, he also explained that “there is a fine line and hopefully, there can be a balance found between the letter and the spirit of the law.”

Smith explained that he heard no complaints about the sale. “Students were not critical. A lot of people thought it was a good, creative idea. People had fun with buying a pencil. No one was upset,” Smith said.

Senior Class President Michelle Cahn admitted that the pencil sale “kind of manipulated the rule” but she also said, “I think they did it in a way that isn’t really hurting anyone, and it’s a fun way to work around it [the no-bake sale rule]. I think it was a good idea on their part.”

Having sales that involve baked goods “raises a lot more money. They are definitely the best option because . . . you make the profit with spending money on pizza or other things,” Cahn said.

The sale of four-inch golf pencils proved effective. The Junior Student Council raised more than $200, their biggest food-related sale. “It was the first time in second semester that we raised a significant amount of money,” Smith said.

Smith plans to continue pencil sales until told by an administrator to stop.

A version of this article appeared in print on 28 February 2012, on page 3 of The Shakerite.

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