Paving the Way to Business

Projects throughout the city aim to increase development

A+sign+near+the+intersection+of+Lee+road+and+Parkland+drive+warns+drivers+about+road+work+in+the+area%2C+one+of+seven+projects+--+according+to+the+city%E2%80%99s+website.+%E2%80%9CIt+definitely+has+an+impact+with+the+detours%2C+but+unfortunately++that+is+the+price+we+have+to+pay+to+improve+our+city%2C%E2%80%9D+said+Patricia+Speese%2C+director+of+the+public+works+department.
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Paving the Way to Business

A sign near the intersection of Lee road and Parkland drive warns drivers about road work in the area, one of seven projects -- according to the city’s website. “It definitely has an impact with the detours, but unfortunately  that is the price we have to pay to improve our city,” said Patricia Speese, director of the public works department.

A sign near the intersection of Lee road and Parkland drive warns drivers about road work in the area, one of seven projects -- according to the city’s website. “It definitely has an impact with the detours, but unfortunately that is the price we have to pay to improve our city,” said Patricia Speese, director of the public works department.

The Shakerite

A sign near the intersection of Lee road and Parkland drive warns drivers about road work in the area, one of seven projects -- according to the city’s website. “It definitely has an impact with the detours, but unfortunately that is the price we have to pay to improve our city,” said Patricia Speese, director of the public works department.

The Shakerite

The Shakerite

A sign near the intersection of Lee road and Parkland drive warns drivers about road work in the area, one of seven projects -- according to the city’s website. “It definitely has an impact with the detours, but unfortunately that is the price we have to pay to improve our city,” said Patricia Speese, director of the public works department.

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Simultaneous road, lake and rapid station projects continue to lengthen commutes throughout the city in a local government push hoping to attract businesses.

“One of the most common concerns council hears is the condition of roads. So, council has approved more funds than typical to improve streets and roads across Shaker Heights,” Councilman Tres Roeder wrote in an email interview.

According to Roeder, city council hopes that projects like the $100 million Van Aken district redevelopment will build a commercial tax base in Shaker and result in lower tax rates for residents.

However, Shaker senior Mattie Conley said that the construction has been frustrating to navigate, especially in the evening, when “it takes forever to get home.”

According to the City of Shaker Heights website, Shaker Boulevard has undergone resurfacing since April.

Roeder wrote that the construction will result in new roads, buildings and infrastructure.

Other projects, like the Green Lake Dredging Project and RTA construction, have also resulted in road closings.

“Dredging construction on Green Lake will result in a more attractive and healthier ecosystem.  Construction on the rapid stations is delivering better lit and more accessible platforms,” Roeder wrote.

He also noted that there will be less construction in future years because council approved so many this past summer.

Patricia Speese, director of the public works department, said that Shaker has been fortunate to get grants to fund projects. “It definitely has an impact with the detours, but unfortunately  that is the price we have to pay to improve our city.”

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